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    Languedoc-Roussillon Vintage Chart

    The 2018 Vintage in France, by Andrew Jefford

    Andrew Jefford, award-winning author and columnist in every issue of Decanter and World of Fine Wine, Co-Chair Decanter World Wine Awards; Vice-Chair Decanter Asia Wine Awards as well as Wine Scholar Guild Academic Advisor, gives us his insight about the 2018 vintage in France.

    As October 2018 got underway, wine-growing France let out an audible collective sigh of relief. After shortages due to repeated hail and frost traumas in recent years, 2018 marked a gratifying return to generosity for French wine growers.

    Read more...

    A Guide to Recent Barolo and Barbaresco Vintages

    Thanks to a string of successful vintages, there has been a great deal of recent publicity regarding Barolo and Barbaresco wines.

    Produced entirely from Nebbiolo, these two iconic wines have changed in style over the past 20-30 years; where once, the wines were reserved upon release, today, the wines are riper and more forward. This is largely due to climate change, as warmer temperatures throughout the growing season have necessitated Nebbiolo harvests some two to three weeks earlier these days than in the 1980s, ‘70s and prior; while late October to early November was normal for a Nebbiolo harvest thirty and forty years ago, today, harvest is more typically in early-mid October.

    Read more...

    Rhône Valley Vintage Charts & Ratings

    Back to French Vintage Chart

    The vintage chart and harvest reports provided by the Wine Scholar Guild gives you the ranking for every French wine region and vintage from 2000 to today.

    Andrew Jefford, award-winning wine journalist for Decanter Magazine and author of twelve books on wine including The New France has compiled information and written the vintage charts starting with the 2013 vintage. He is also updating information for the vintages prior to 2013.

    Last updated: October 2nd 2019

    Northern Rhône Vintage Chart

    Vintage Quality Drink Comments
    2018 Red:

    White:
    Drink/Cellar

    A cold February aside, winter and spring were both mild and wet in the Northern Rhône; bud-break came with great warmth at the end of April followed by flowering at the end of May (with storms on May 30th causing some crop loss in Crozes-Hermitage).  Summer was in general hot and sunny, and a heavy storm on August 11th was beneficial to the vines.  Harvest began in late August for the whites, and early September for the reds, in beautifully clear and sunny conditions, and most growers were thrilled with both the quantity and quality of their harvest: a blend of the wealth and richness of 2017 with the vivacity and intensity of 2016.  Condrieu is outstanding.  Both red and white wines look set to age particularly well.

    2017 Red:

    White:
    Drink/Cellar First, the good news: the Northern Rhône escaped the depradations of spring frost that caused such trouble elsewhere in France. The bad news, though, was that flowering was erratic, and a very early, very dry season led to reduced yields in any case, with small clusters and berries making for a harvest of concentrated, intense and often high-alcohol wines. Flowering for Viognier in Condrieu was particularly difficult, with crop reductions of up to 50%. After a harvest that was often three weeks earlier than normal, though, producers were in general very happy with quality, particularly for the red wines: rich, relatively low-acid reds. The whites are fat and succulent.
    2016 Red:

    White:
    Drink/Cellar A mild winter and warm early spring gave way to cool and wet weather as spring progressed (March was as cold as January this year); hail struck Hermitage in April, cutting yields by two-thirds in some lieux-dits (such as Roucoules).  The cool, wet weather persisted into summer, meaning that flowering was three weeks behind schedule and mildew threatened.  In July, though, the tenor of the season changed with the onset of hot, dry weather; there was no further rain until midway through what proved to be an unusually hot and sunny September.  October was fine, too, meaning a leisurely harvest of well-balanced, fresh and pristine red and white wines. 
    2015 Red:

    White:
    Drink/Cellar Both winter and spring were wet, but by June the clouds had gone and there was no more rain until mid-August. It was a splendid summer, with the Northern Rhône actually hotter than the Southern Rhône for most of July; August brought cooler nights. There was welcome rain on August 15th and in early September, followed by more fine, warm weather. Marcel Guigal declared 2015 the best vintage in 55 years and as good as 1929, 1947 and 1961. The reds are outstanding in all appellations, and whites very good save in the very warmest sites (such as Condrieu) where some chunkiness is evident.
    2014 Red:

    White:
    Drink Spring was warm and precocious and flowering went well, setting a large crop. After that, though, summer turned cool and wet; there were episodes of hail in July and September in Cornas, Hermitage and Crozes-Hermitage, meaning that some growers in those regions had to pick prematurely. Hillside vineyards, in general, fared better than flat-land vineyards in this wet year. Whites can be good, but reds are often light and grassy.
    2013 Red:

    White:
    Drink After a lingering winter, spring was gloomy and cool, with record rainfall in May. This was a dismal start to the season resulting in crop losses of up to 40%. June and July remained cool, and July was wet. August and September, by contrast, were beautiful months, hot and sunny, and since the crop was small much of the lost ripening time could be recovered. Harvest took place during the first half of October before further rain arrived. These conditions produced fine white wines: concentrated, fresh and aromatic. The reds are pure and shapely, but with high acid levels.
    2012 Red:

    White:
    Drink Very wet spring compromised flowering, reduced crop. Warm and sunny summer. Good harvest conditions. Sound, mature grapes. Red wines are supple, possess ripe fruit, soft tannin & complementary acidities. Not a vintage for the long term. Very attractive whites.
    2011 Red:

    White:
    Drink Ideal spring, healthy flowering boosted crop size. Cold and wet in late June & July, dry August, mixed September. Healthy fruit, generally sound mature grapes. Medium-weight reds with youthful charm, accessibility. Many excellent examples, best for mid-term aging. Fruit-filled, expressive whites ready now.
    2010 Red:

    White:
    Drink Flowering spoiled by rain, coulure reduced crop substantially. Dry & cool summer, slow maturation. Harvest extended into October. Highly concentrated, firmly structured reds with acidity & tannin, yet impeccable equilibrium. A vintage to cellar: patience will be rewarded. Whites offer intensity, substance & unusual tension.
    2009 Red:

    White:
    Drink Healthy flowering in good conditions. Sunny, windy & hot weather ran from July into August and advanced ripening. Reds with overt fruit, density & warmth; dry tannins need time to resolve. Superb Hermitage, Saint-Joseph. Diverse whites, some excellent, fruity & rich; best have balancing acidity.
    2008 Red:

    White:
    Drink Difficult, warm, wet spring led to widespread mildew, reducing crop. Rain prevalent throughout summer, with unusually frequent hailstorms. Delayed maturation & extended small harvest. Lighter reds with higher acidity. Condrieu stands out.
    2007 Red:

    White:
    Drink Unusually warm, dry winter & early budburst. Well above average rainfall April to June. Precocious flowering & véraison (up to 3 weeks early). Reduced crop. Optimal conditions (sunshine, cool nights) from late August produced balanced, ripe reds & whites.
    2006 Red:

    White:
    Drink Abnormally cold, snowy winter. Cool, dry spring, very low temperatures for flowering caused coulure, millerandage. June heat wave continued into July, with hailstorms. Healthy harvest of mature reds, some with lower acidities, more forward than ’05. Notable Hermitage and Côte-Rôtie.
    2005 Red:

    White:
    Drink Balanced season without extremes. Concentrated wines with dense fruit, well-calibrated acidity, firm & ripe tannin. Top reds have considerable reserve, demand long cellaring. Delicious, elegant whites; exceptional Condrieu.
    2004 Red:

    White:
    Past peak A regular season with normal temperatures after two aberrant years. Generally high yields. Sound mature grapes of moderate substance delivering elegant reds. Cornas stands out. Harvest volumes rebounded from low ’03 levels are particularly generous at Condrieu, Côte-Rôtie.
    2003 Red:

    White:
    Drink A year of high temperatures & low rainfall. Early, rapid flowering. Localized storms and hail in late July cut crop. Heat shriveled berries in August on most exposed slopes further reducing yields. Early small harvest of healthy grapes with thick skins. Deeply colored, concentrated, potent top reds with “baked” aspect, imposing tannins. Resemble ’83 or ’78 at best; some are over ripe. As with ’03 Bordeaux, divided opinions.
    2002 Red:

    White:
    Past peak Cold, dry spring, then hot late May. Stormy summer into September. Rot a serious challenge in some zones (e.g., Côte-Rôtie). Rain in late September, but North avoided the disastrous storms in the South. Reds lacking maturity and substance; whites better.
    2001 Red:

    White:
    Drink Healthy flowering, green harvest common. Largely dry summer with cooler periods. Warm, not hot September extended ripening. Best reds showed intensity, reserve & tannic structure for long cellaring.
    2000 Red:

    White:
    Drink Generous fruit set led to crop thinning and saignée to concentrate top wines. Reds of moderate concentration & longevity weaker than both ‘99s & ‘01s. Excellent whites.

     

    Southern Rhône Vintage Chart

    Vintage Quality Drink Comments
    2018 Red:

    White:
    Drink/Cellar The Southern Rhône in general has an earlier cycle than the Northern Rhône, and the very wet winter and spring conditions (600 mm of rain by mid-June: more than the average annual total) combined with less Mistral wind than usual meant rampant late May mildew attacks. These provided challenging conditions for the Grenache in many vineyards, with Ch de Beaucastel (for example) losing around half its average annual crop and Vieux Donjon 20 per cent. After that early season shock, a warm summer with a well-stocked water table followed by splendid harvest weather meant that growers could take their time and harvest at perfect ripeness. This was vital in the case of the Grenache, since the mildew attacks of early summer meant inconsistent ripening; in general, other varieties fared better and blends may include more Syrah and Mourvèdre than usual. Quality is good for both red and white wines, with low acidity, supple tannins and perfumed, seductive fruits, promising excellent mid-term storage.
    2017 Red:

    White:
    Drink/Cellar As in the Northern Rhône, the Southern Rhône escaped major frost damage in late April, though some small parcels with poor air drainage were hit. The early season, though, meant that heavy rain in May caused extensive coulure for the ever-sensitive Grenache, with losses for that variety of between 30% and 60%. Syrah was less badly affected, and Mourvèdre unaffected. The rains finished by early June – and there was almost no further precipitation all season. Conditions at the end of June were very hot (a peak of 41˚C), and meant that véraison was underway by July 7th in Châteauneuf; thereafter the heat of summer eased back to normal levels. Growers report perfect ripening conditions with freshness as well as richness and little drought stress. Quality looks very promising for both white and red wines.
    2016 Red:

    White:
    Drink/Cellar In contrast to conditions in the Northern Rhône, the Southern Rhône enjoyed a trouble-free start to the 2016 growing season, with an early vegetative cycle and warm weather punctuated by useful but not excessive spring showers.  Coulure in the Grenache was less marked than in 2015.  “It was the hottest summer during daytime but the coolest summer during nighttime,” reported one grower of the 2016 vintage, and this steady, even heat mitigated by brisk nights produced an outstanding harvest of generous yet fresh, perfumed and emphatically structured wines.  These conditions suited whites as well as they did reds, and the wines have outstanding cellar potential.
    2015 Red:

    White:
    Drink A wet winter and early spring gave way, in March and April, to warm, dry weather, though some coulure (shatter) affected the Grenache at flowering. June, July and August were all hot and dry which caused some instances of blocked maturity, especially for younger vines. Storms came at the end of August and in September just as the heat moderated, but the weather was still fine enough for growers to be able to wait for perfect levels of ripeness. The reds are pure, ripe and rounded; whites combine freshness with richness and aromatic charm.
    2014 Red:

    White:
    Drink Very warm early spring conditions led to early bud break and, eventually, a generous and precocious fruit set, especially for Grenache as it struggled to reassert itself after its troubled 2013 season. At the end of June, though, summer turned cooler, and the weather remained mixed throughout July, August and September, as brighter periods were followed by clouds and rain. Fastidious vineyard work, including crop-thinning for the Grenache, was necessary to make good wines, and this was complicated by the presence of Drosophila suzukii flies with their attendant risk of acid rot. After the early start to the season, harvest was relatively late, and this long hang-time made for some attractive, supple red and white wines for relatively early consumption.
    2013 Red:

    White:
    Drink After a long, cold winter with freezing February conditions, spring was unseasonably cool and wet (twice the average rainfall) with catastrophically poor flowering weather for the Grenache. This resulted in losses of up to 70% of this key Southern Rhône variety. During June, the weather finally turned warmer, and July was hot and sunny with mixed but generally good weather thereafter. Nonetheless, harvest for most was in October. There are some good though atypical red wines due to an emphasis on Syrah and Mourvèdre and lighter-than-usual alcohol levels. The whites, by contrast, were good: pure, fresh and bright.
    2012 Red:

    White:
    Drink Erratic spring, irregular flowering, late harvest. Extremely dry April to July, similar to 2010. Rain at end of August controlled water stress. Variable levels of maturity often required several tries to pick ripe fruit. Mourvèdre struggled to ripen. Sorting also key to outcomes. Moderately concentrated reds with forward fruit & freshness, likely to develop in near term. Whites reveal ample fruit, definition & show well early.
    2011 Red:

    White:
    Drink Favorable spring, hot June with very early flowering. Cooler July, beneficial rainfall. August into autumn was particularly hot & dry. Compared to 2010, more sunshine hours, more summer days of high heat, greater precipitation. Excellent weather extended harvest into early October. Extroverted reds of moderate concentration and attractive fruit. Most accessible & drinkable early; top cuvées will keep for mid-term.
    2010 Red:

    White:
    Drink Significant reductions in Grenache crop due to poor flowering. Fully mature reds, alcohols equal to more flamboyant ‘07s, yet wines appear fresh, well-defined & balanced. Many reds will gain with cellaring; most concentrated ones are reticent now. Whites possess noteworthy concentration & uncharacteristic backbone. Both colors will have longer lives than is typical for Southern Rhône.
    2009 Red:

    White:
    Drink Rapid progression of growing season, hot & dry July, harvest commencing as early as mid-August. Water stress disturbed maturation of some sites; deep-rooted old vines handled conditions best. Full-bodied, powerful reds, elevated alcohol; Grenache with flavor of kirsch liqueur, some have a “roasted” aspect. Ripe, perfumed, fleshy whites to enjoy early as a rule.
    2008 Red:

    White:
    Past peak Challenging growing season (delayed ripening & problems with mildew) demanded skill & careful husbandry in vineyard. Best reds are moderately concentrated, restrained & elegant: a “cooler” style than typical. Gigondas, Rasteau are attractive.
    2007 Red:

    White:
    Drink Very early start to season; summer without rain. Ideal final stretch for maturation, without extremes. Reds with bountiful & rich fruit, fine tannins, lower acidity. Soft, round whites for early drinking.
    2006 Red:

    White:
    Drink Colder August than usual, cool nights. Some locales affected by storms. Syrah particularly successful. Balanced wines offering depth, freshness & finesse. Many Châteauneuf will develop further.
    2005 Red:

    White:
    Drink Extremely low winter precipitation balanced by April rains. Optimal season producing concentrated, structured wines with ripe tannins for long cellaring. Memorable Gigondas, red & white Châteauneuf.
    2004 Red:

    White:
    Past peak Some locales experienced heat & water stress, reducing yields. Châteauneuf & Gigondas are stars of vintage. They are more complete than leading Northern reds in ’04.
    2003 Red:

    White:
    Past peak Intensely hot from June through end of summer. Lower rainfall. Record temperature of 109° F at Orange. Harvest of white grapes 2 weeks early, reds picked as of late August. Very high sugars, especially inGrenache. Syrah, Cinsault, Carignan, Mourvèdre performed better as did older vines. Very generous reds, higher alcohols, marked tannin. Some are past peak, now taste “cooked.” Gigondas from cooler sites has aged better. Some impressive Châteauneuf, but not to keep further. Fat, rich whites enjoyable early.
    2002 Red:

    White:
    Past peak Normal summer & ripening arrested by torrential rain on 8 September, equivalent of annual precipitation in some areas; flooding in Gard & Vaucluse. Cooler, windy late September. Strict selection needed. Minimum alcohol level dropped for many red AOCs.
    2001 Red:

    White:
    Drink Grenache experienced uneven flowering. Very hot end of August with intense Mistral wind. High sugars, sound pH & acidity; a few wines short of complete phenolic maturity. Lower volumes.
    2000 Red:

    White:
    Drink Grenache experienced uneven flowering. Very hot end of August with intense Mistral wind. High sugars, sound pH & acidity; a few wines short of complete phenolic maturity. Lower volumes.

     

    Quality Poor Poor
    to
    Fair
    Fair Fair
    to
    Good
    Good Good
    to
    Excellent
    Excellent Excellent
    to
    Exceptional
    Exceptional
    Chart Legend

    These vintage notes have been prepared by Andrew Jefford, Academic Advisor to the Wine Scholar Guild. New vintage information, and any revisions of previous vintage drinking suggestions, are made each autumn.  Use the chart as a guide only; in every vintage there will be outperforming and underperforming wines.

    LEARN MORE ABOUT RHÔNE VALLEY WINES:

    Back to French Vintage Chart

     

    Read more...

    Loire Valley Vintage Charts & Ratings

    Back to French Vintage Chart

    The vintage chart and harvest reports provided by the Wine Scholar Guild gives you the ranking for every French wine region and vintage from 2000 to today.

    Andrew Jefford, award-winning wine journalist for Decanter Magazine and author of twelve books on wine including The New France has compiled information and written the vintage charts starting with the 2013 vintage. He is also updating information for the vintages prior to 2013.

    Last updated: October 2nd 2019

    Loire Valley Vintage Chart

    Vintage Quality Drink Comments
    2018 Drink/Cellar A dark, wet and cold winter in the Loire persisted well into March, and it was only with the advent of much warmer weather in April that budburst took place (the 21st was the warmest April day on record). The frost danger receded with a very wet May and early June, though this caused some mildew losses. Flowering went well in early June, and from mid-June the weather pattern became stable, with hot, dry and sunny weather. It was the hottest summer since 2003, and the driest since 1945, eliminating stubborn mildew outbreaks. Sunny, dry weather persisted throughout the harvest period, from the end of August all the way through to October for some of the Cabernet-based reds and botrytis-affected whites.  Growers throughout the Loire, from Muscadet to Sancerre, were uniformly pleased with both the quantity and quality of their harvest (“1947 but with quantity!” according to Alphone Mellot Snr): clean fruit, with ample ripeness yet sustained by vivid acidity. The wines are set to age exceptionally well.
    2017 Drink/Cellar After a difficult season in 2016, most Loire growers were happy with the quality of this remarkably early vintage, though quantities remain below average. As in so many French regions, some parts of the Loire were badly hit by April frosts: Muscadet was 35-40% below normal; Savennières was catastrophically affected; Saumur-Champigny saw a reduction of 30% after frost over four nights (26-29 April); while Cheverny, Menetou-Salon, Coteaux du Giennois and some parts of Pouilly-Fumé were badly hit among the Sauvignon-producing zones. After the frost traumas, though, the summer was near faultless, and the harvest took place from the end of August around two weeks in advance of the normal date. The wines are intense, pungent and vivacious, and the best are expected to age well; the sweet wines are as successful as the dry wines this year. Chinon and Bourgueil have produced noteworthy reds.
    2016 Drink/Cellar The 2016 vintage was a difficult one in many parts of the Loire valley.  The culprits were frosts on the nights of April 26th and 27th, followed by heavy rains in May and June which led to catastrophic outbreaks of mildew; drought and high temperatures in July and August also had a negative effect.  Muscadet was very badly hit, with a third of the zone unpicked and the smallest crop since 1949; other areas affected include Montlouis, Chinon, Bourgeuil and St Nicolas de Bourgeuil, Saumur-Champigny, Menetou-Salon, Pouilly-Fumé (but not Sancerre), Quincy and Reuilly.  Fine September weather towards the end of the season, though, helped create fresh and vibrant wines with ample classicism from those grapes which survived the early season depradations and the summer heat.
    2015 Drink After the warmest winter in a century, late February and March were cool, so flowering came normally in early April, with more cool weather at the end of April and early May.  After that, summer was sunny and warm with a very hot, early July.  The growers were happy to see some mid-August rain, and fine, warm weather then returned for a leisurely September harvest.  This is a great vintage across the board in the Loire, for dry wines, for red wines (which are riper than in 2014), and for sweet wines too (with vivid, fresh acidity as well as generous sugars).  The best wines will make superb cellar prospects.
    2014 Drink After a warm end to winter and a very dry March, bud break came early at the beginning of April.  There was good weather for successful flowering, too, but apart from that, summer was cool and, between mid-July and mid-August, very wet.  The weather finally changed at the end of August, and September was record-breakingly dry, sunny and windy, meaning that with maturity came concentration.  Harvesting began in mid-September and gave an excellent crop of dry white and red wines with outstanding Muscadet and Sancerre and very good Anjou-Villages and Chinon.  There was rain in early October which cut the crop of sweet wines, but those who waited for fine weather at the end of October made small quantities of moelleux and liquoreux, the latter with over 20˚ of potential alcohol.
    2013 Drink Late winter and spring saw prolonged cold, meaning that bud break came two weeks late, into mid-April (with Saumur-Champigny suffering a late April frost). Late spring was barely better, with delayed flowering, sometimes as late as early July, accompanied by coulure (shatter) and millerandage (shot berries).  Vouvray was hit by a severe hail storm on June 17th which destroyed two-thirds of its crop.  July and August, by contrast, were hot and sunny, while September was generally benign, although more humid.  The October harvest (late September in Muscadet) was the latest in two decades.  Fair to good results were achieved by those white-wine producers who worked hard in the vineyards and sorted their crop, but it was a less exciting year for reds, and there were few late-harvest wines.
    2012 Drink Troubled spring across region, cool & rainy, reducing yields severely, (1.9 million hl, well below 5-year average & 34% less than ’09). Good September weather rescued early-ripening varieties, sites.  Rain & cold returned in October. Excellent Muscadet albeit drastically reduced crop: intensity, acid backbone; best will keep. Anjou-Saumur, Touraine Chenins picked in good conditions. Cabernets are supple, fruity & forward if rather light.
    2011 Drink Promising start to season, less favorable later. Very early start to season, then cooler in mid-summer. Good Muscadet, successful Anjou Chenins secs.  Early harvest in Centre, mostly picked by mid-September. Ripe Sauvignons often with lower acidities for early drinking. At best, mature Cabernets harvested as early as beginning of September in Chinon, Bourgueil; less maturity in poor locales.
    2010 Drink Regular conditions. Season with contrasting hot & cool periods, irregular flowering & ripening by parcel. Muscadet with above average concentration & structure. Cabernet Franc of sound ripeness if picked late. Many Sauvignons have intensity, aromatic complexity. A year combining quality & above average quantity.
    2009 Drink Dry from June through warm September. Very successful Muscadet, ripe Chenins in Anjou, Touraine.  Hailstorms cut crop in Menetou-Salon, Sancerre. Sauvignons attained high sugars, sound acidity from cool September nights in Centre; last to be picked lack acidity. Fully mature Cabernet Franc, generous Chinon & other Touraine reds with flattering fruit qualities. Prolific vintage of 2.9 million hl. Generously, lushly endowed sweet wines from Anjou and Touraine.
    2008 Drink Cold summer, favorable September & October. Best wines harvested later & benefitted from long maturation. Concentrated whites will keep well. Fruity, fresh reds; weaker examples are not ripe.  Reduced overall volume, decimated crop in Nantais (1/2 of 2009) due to frost.
    2007 Past peak Difficult flowering, wet & cold summer, notably stormy August with low temperatures. Mildew a problem. Best whites are expressive, possess pointed acidity; some lack maturity. Best in Muscadet, Anjou. Many under-ripe, herbaceous reds; successes were harvested later.
    2006 Past peak Good summer weather, rain in mid/late September complicated picking across region.best are ripe, full-bodied. Results hinged on skill & timing of vigneron, particularly picking dates.Muscadet suffered. Most Sauvignon in Centre brought in before storms;best are ripe, full-bodied. Results hinged on skill & timing of vigneron, particularly picking dates.
    2005 Drink Early harvest in benign conditions, consistently ripe & balanced wines. Concentrated whites with backbone, often very full-bodied. Reds even better, for many best of decade: fully mature, atypically dense, age-worthy. A great sweet-wine vintage, with both raisining and noble rot giving wines of concentration, depth and succulence.
    2004 Past peak Favorable September, generous yields. Typical light- to medium-weight wines, sound maturities; most to drink early. Some examples were weak, green. Centre saw late harvesting extending into October producing etched Sauvignons with herbaceous notes.
    2003 Past peak Earliest harvest since 1893 (e.g., starting 19 August in Nantais & Centre). Variable season, extremely hot August, grapes “burnt” by sun. Old vines fare better. Very high levels of maturity likened to 1959 or 1947. Reduced volumes. Rich Muscadet & Chenins. Full, ripe Sauvignon with unusually high alcohol lacked typicity. Many excellent reds: fruity, supple, fine tannins. Nearly all to drink young. The best sweet wines, by contrast, remain generous and opulent.
    2002 Drink Below normal harvest volume, uniform quality. Rainy August, warm & dry September/October. Muscadet endowed with rich fruit. Successful Chenins secs in Anjou-Saumur, Touraine. Appealing Chinon, Saumur-Champigny; some reds insufficiently ripe. Sauvignons in Centre possessed generous, ripe fruit. The sweet wines are rich yet balanced thanks to raisining rather than noble rot in this vintage.
    2001 Past peak Excellent flowering, high temperatures in summer. Muscadet performed well. In Anjou-Saumur, rich Chenins. High rainfall in Touraine, earlier harvest; wines reflect maturity  similar to 2000. Solid reds. Mixed results for Sauvignons in Centre where rain & rot disrupted maturation.
    2000 Past peak Cool, wet July, hot June & August. Grapes picked before mid-October rains made successful wines. Rich, full-bodied Muscadet. Light Chenins in Anjou-Saumur & Touraine; Savennières above average. Ripe, balanced Sauvignons in Centre benefitted from favorable September. Soft, forward reds.

     

    Quality Poor Poor
    to
    Fair
    Fair Fair
    to
    Good
    Good Good
    to
    Excellent
    Excellent Excellent
    to
    Exceptional
    Exceptional
    Chart Legend

    These vintage notes have been prepared by Andrew Jefford, Academic Advisor to the Wine Scholar Guild. New vintage information, and any revisions of previous vintage drinking suggestions, are made each autumn.  Use the chart as a guide only; in every vintage there will be outperforming and underperforming wines.

    LEARN MORE ABOUT LOIRE VALLEY WINES:

    Back to French Vintage Chart

     

    • Alsace

      Jun 07 - Jun 12, 2020

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    • Champagne

      Jun 23 - Jun 27, 2020

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      Sep 13 - Sep 18, 2020
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      Oct 04 - Oct 09, 2020
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      Oct 11 - Oct 16, 2020
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      Oct 11 - Oct 16, 2020

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    Provence Vintage Charts & Ratings

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    The vintage chart and harvest reports provided by the Wine Scholar Guild gives you the ranking for every French wine region and vintage from 2000 to today.

    Andrew Jefford, award-winning wine journalist for Decanter Magazine and author of twelve books on wine including The New France has compiled information and written the vintage charts starting with the 2013 vintage. He is also updating information for the vintages prior to 2013.

    Last updated: October 2nd 2019

    Provence Vintage Chart

    Vintage Quality Drink Comments
    2018 Drink/cellar reds Provence, like the Southern Rhône, suffered from acute mildew pressure due to warm, almost tropical conditions with much less Mistral than usual in the first half of the year, and this led to heterogenous ripening in many parcels. There were also three hail episodes in the Var on June 24th, August 5th and August 14th which caused local damage to around 500 ha of vines. As elsewhere in France, though, harvest conditions (from mid-August in Provence) were ideal, and for those who were able to overcome the mildew challenge quality was good. Quantities, by contrast, were lower than usual again this year, meaning that Provence rosé was, during the 2019 sales period, in relatively short supply.
    2017 Drink/cellar reds Provence, like the Rhône valley, generally escaped the frost problems which affected so much of France -- though a small area in the Var suffered, mostly planted with IGP fruit. It was, however, the third year of summer drought in Provence, and this meant small berries, small bunches and reduced yields; the harvest was 18% down on 2016.  The early season and bright, hot summer also meant an extraordinarily early vintage, beginning in Pierrefeu on August 11th, and everywhere at least two weeks ahead of the previous average for warm or hot years. Tempier in Bandol began on August 22nd and finished on September 12th. Gowers were very pleased with the quality, suggesting that the Mistral had been critical in ensuring freshness in the fruit, and that 2016-2017 winter rains had also kept the vines healthy during the long, hot summer.
    2016 Drink/cellar reds The wet spring which characterised many French wine regions in 2016 eluded Provence as it did Languedoc, and apart from a minor frost on April 29th the main growing-season challenge was drought: less than 200 mm of rain throughout the entire season in Bandol, for example, and an almost completely rainless summer in Bellet.  The result was a shortfall of 10 to 30 per cent depending on  zone, and very small berries which were not always ideal for rosé production where ‘juiciness’ is a desideratum.  The quality of both white and (especially) red wines, though, was high since the summer heat was tempered by cool nights and the grapes retained fresh acidity, while the lowered yields provided impressive concentration of flavour.
    2015 Drink After a very wet winter for the second year running, spring was warm and dry and bud break took place earlier than usual.  Flowering went well, and summer was generally warm but without excessive heat; rain around June 15th was helpful.  The conditions of steady, tempered heat continued throughout August, and the rosé harvest began at the end of that month under clear skies, with grapes for white and red wines generally picked in the first half of September.  Quantities are slightly lower than in 2015 but quality is exceptional; Bandol reds are outstanding.
    2014 Drink Winter was wetter than average, especially in January and February, and there were further episodes of rain in March and May.  Summer was cooler than usual with occasional further storms and hail episodes around Mont Sainte-Victoire and in Coteaux Varois.  The weather cleared at the end of August, and September was the warmest month of the summer, though from mid-September the Mistral gave way to an easterly wind which saw the return of humid conditions.  September 19th brought violent storms and hail in Bandol, though many growers had picked by then.  Quality was better than growers had feared, with fresh, lively whites and rosés and poised, mid-weight reds.
    2013 Drink After a long, cool and slow spring, the entire growing season (bud break, flowering, véraison and harvest) was about two weeks later than usual.  There were hail storms in the Var in June, but the disease pressure of early summer gradually abated thanks to the Mistral as September approached.  It was a good vintage for those who long for delicacy and freshness in white and rosé wines, but the reds are light to mid-weight and, generally  speaking, not for long storage.
    2012 Drink Rainy spring, hail in central Provence in late May. Hot, dry summer, drought in Bouches-du-Rhône. Rainstorms from mid-August into September. Fresh, elegant rosés. Concentrated whites with marked acidity, best will keep. Restrained, balanced reds, Coteaux Varois Syrah stands out. Moderate alcohol levels. Overall volume down by 20%.
    2011 Drink Mixed growing season. Dry, sunny spring, flowering in good conditions. Uneven summer: cool, wet July; hot, dry mid-August to mid-September. Beneficial moisture in early September followed by drying Mistral wind. Cool nights during harvest. Heterogeneous maturation. Elegant, aromatic rosés, well-defined reds, especially Coteaux Varois & d’Aix.  Bandol particularly successful & structured; best will need cellaring.
    2010 Drink Widely varying weather by département. More rainfall in some sectors than recent years. June floods in central Var.  Harvest pushed back by 1 to 3 weeks depending on locale; some red varieties not picked until end of October. Most reds moderately concentrated, whites & rosés with high acidities, generally lower alcohol: a year of finesse. Alternating sun/rain resulted in late, extended harvest in Bandol: spicy, defined reds, moderate alcohol.
    2009 Drink Beneficial winter rains, good weather. Dry summer. Early vintage, balanced sugar & acidity enhanced by diurnal temperature variation. Ripe wines of all colors, very successful reds. In some cases, elevated alcohol, low acidities. Hot, dry summer in Bandol, even Mourvèdre ripened early. Reds reveal fruit, notable acidity, fine tannins.
    2008 Past peak Difficult year. High levels of mildew & colder, wetter end to growing season demanded careful vineyard maintenance. Smaller crop of fresh rosés & whites, fruit-filled & defined reds. Generally lower alcohol, higher acidity. Varied September weather in Bandol yielded reds with tension & definition. With a“cooler,” more classic expression than 2007.
    2007 Drink/Past peak Warm August leading up to harvest. Cool nights. Storms in Var, Coteaux d’Aix. Elsewhere, water & wind stress in summer. Early healthy harvest but rather low volume. Atypically ripe, fleshy, sometimes heady whites & rosés. Reds with concentrated fruit. Bandol shines very expressive with generous fruit; best demand further aging. Some compare 2007 to 1998, an exceptional year.
    2006 Past peak Mild spring, some rain April through July. Hot windy August. Elevated amount of sunshine throughout season, lower precipitation. Drought in central Provence salvaged by late rains. Agreeable rosés, elegant whites. Structured reds suitable for mid-term cellaring, most are now ready. Extremely early harvest of healthy, ripe fruit in Bandol:  reds are fresh, elegant.
    2005 Drink/Past peak In general, a dry season with absence of heat extremes, small harvest. Expressive, typical whites & rosés; firm reds with intense fruit. In Bandol, cool August nights, September punctuated by rain, no mistral; low yields, concentrated, well-defined reds for keeping. In general, less salutary results in Provence than other regions in ’05.
    2004 Past peak Low yielding year (35-40 hl/ha) across all types, particularly small for Mourvèdre. Above average acidity. Balanced reds with moderately concentrated, fine tannins. Hot summer days, cool nights freshened by Mistral produced attractive Bandol with moderate alcohol, spice & fresh acidity.
    2003 Past peak Summer heat wave, coastal vineyards enjoyed moderating winds. Notably low yields in driest areas. Grenache suffered, Cinsault & Mourvèdre tolerated extremes better. Many wines with low acidity, high alcohol. Dry tannins in some reds; best are concentrated & required cellaring. Bandol reds have softened & surprised after time in bottle.
    2002 Past peak Rosés were good, many other wines often weak, green, unripe. Tiny yields in Bandol: reds are fruity with moderate alcohol.
    2001 Past peak Reds were a success, notably Bandol: powerful, aromatic with better phenolic maturity than 2000. Rosés to drink on release, heavy whites now well past their best.
    2000 Past peak High temperatures, low yields in Bandol resulted in dense wines with high alcohol. Reds tended to have unripe, dry tannins. Weak, fragile whites.

     


    Quality Poor Poor
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    Fair
    Fair Fair
    to
    Good
    Good Good
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    Excellent
    Excellent Excellent
    to
    Exceptional
    Exceptional
    Chart Legend

    These vintage notes have been prepared by Andrew Jefford, Academic Advisor to the Wine Scholar Guild. New vintage information, and any revisions of previous vintage drinking suggestions, are made each autumn.  Use the chart as a guide only; in every vintage there will be outperforming and underperforming wines.

    LEARN MORE ABOUT PROVENCE WINES:

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    Alsace Vintage Charts & Ratings

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    The vintage chart and harvest reports provided by the Wine Scholar Guild gives you the ranking for every French wine region and vintage from 2000 to today.

    Andrew Jefford, award-winning wine journalist for Decanter Magazine and author of twelve books on wine including The New France, has compiled information and written the vintage charts starting with the 2013 vintage. He is also updating information for the vintages prior to 2013.

    Last updated: October 2nd 2019

    Alsace

    Vintage Quality Drink Comments
    2018 Drink/Cellar After a mild, wet January, February was cold and snowy, with temperatures of -13°C by the end of the month. March and April turned wet and mild again and flowering came in early June, up to two weeks early, as the rains continued: Alsace received a year’s rainfall in the first seven months of the year. Temperatures soared and the humidity dropped away from the end of July, with a 40°C heat spike at the end of August. The warm weather continued throughout September and into October, as the nights increasingly grew cooler, enabling a leisurely harvest to unfold over two months or more. The Crémants were picked from August 22nd, with picking for all varieties underway by the second week in September, depending on site. 2018 is a generous vintage in both quantity and style, with Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir being particularly successful, and with substantial production of both Vendange Tardive wines and Séléction de Grains Nobles. The wines will age well in both dry and sweet style.
    2017 Drink/Cellar After a very cold winter period (with 56 sub-zero days in December 2016 and January 2017), the early spring weather turned warm, with early budburst. As in so many other French regions, frosts struck in late April (20th and 21st in Alsace), affecting 4,500 ha, with 1,500 ha of vineyards losing 80% or more of their crop. The overall harvest (907,000 hl) was 20 per cent down on 2016. The frosts struck flatland or bottom-slope vineyards particularly hard: above all Auxerrois and Pinot Blanc destined for Crémant. After that, conditions were almost perfect for the rest of the season, with a sunny summer interspersed with rain showers, cool nights, and perfect botrytis-forming conditions towards the end of the season.  Summer was also relatively hot here (the fifth hottest in the last 40 years).  It was one of the earliest harvests ever, beginning on August 21st, and although quantity is down, quality is high for all varieties, as well as for red wines and late-harvest wines. The wines are perfumed, complex and concentrated.
    2016 Drink/Cellar After an alarmingly warm January, spring was cool and fretful, and budburst came normally in April.  June was intensely wet, but the weather improved for flowering at the end of the month, and summer was thereafter warm and dry, with no more rain until September 18th.  Harvest began at the end of September and continued through a generally fine October with good ripening conditions, but little or no botrytis (so there will be few Vendange Tardive and SGN wines this year).  The overall harvest size is normal, and 2016 has produced classically poised, fresh Riesling, Pinot Gris and Gewurztraminer wines. 
    2015 Drink/Cellar A perfect weather script for Alsace: a warm, dry spring and early summer was followed by a July heatwave, to the extent that the vines were suffering by early August.  Rain storms on August 9th and 10th were hugely helpful, and after that, the vines ripened perfectly for a leisurely harvest throughout September, VT and SGN included.  All varieties excelled, including Pinot Noir.  2015 is considered the greatest Alsace vintage since 1990 and 1971, though quantities were not large.
    2014 Drink A warm spring and early summer led to an exceptionally successful flowering and fruit set.  July, though, had double its average rainfall, creating disease pressures. August was cooler than usual, leading to Drosophila suzukii attacks on Alsace’s dark-skinned grapes (Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris and Gewurztraminer).  Picking in mid- to late-September produced a smaller-than-hoped-for harvest of beautifully balanced wines which, like 2013, favoured dry styles over sweet.  Riesling and Pinot Gris were particularly successful.
    2013 Drink A cool, slow spring meant that flowering was delayed until the second half of June.  Mid-July to mid-August was warm and dry (though with hail in some sectors), meaning that early September rain was welcome.  The rest of September was dry and sunny prior to an early October harvest.  2013 is a fine, low-yielding year for dry wines, especially Riesling but also Pinot Gris and Gewurztraminer: fresh, elegant and vital.  There are few VT and SGN wines.
    2012 Drink Spring frosts , extended flowering with isolated hail followed by very dry summer & water stress. Beneficial rains in September. Reduced harvest of mature grapes leading to structured wines with potentially long life. Some compare to 2010 or 2002.
    2011 Drink Early start. Cool, wet summer marked by frequent storms. Very sunny end of August. Normal volume after short 2010. Sorting key to quality. Lighter, often delicate wines of lower alcohol & moderate acidity, many with early appeal. Considerable variability.
    2010 Drink Mixed spring weather, prolonged flowering, coulure & millerandage. Irregular ripening by variety & parcel. Low yields of concentrated, expressive wines with elevated acidity. Small quantities of very fine VT/SGN across varieties with marked botrytis. Best dry & late-harvest wines will benefit from long cellaring.
    2009 Drink Early flowering, hot & dry August. Dry September with cool nights. Healthy, mature wines with higher alcohol, ripe acidity. Grands crus highly successful. Fine October weather, VT/SGN resulting from desiccation of berries (passerillage) rather than botrytis. Exceptional late-harvest Riesling.
    2008 Drink Marked variation between early-, late-ripening locales. Damp, cool June extends flowering. Warm but not hot, stormy summer & wet early September. Slow maturation. Structured Riesling, Gewurztraminer from best sites will keep well. Successful VT/SGN wines.
    2007 Drink Uneven, long season. Warm spring, wet & cold periods in summer. Notably slow ripening. Dry wines are elegant, tend to be totally dry in ’07 (no residual sugar). Gewurztraminer excelled: rich, highly aromatic. Large number of exceptional VT/SGN.
    2006 Past peak Benign season ends with rain, 24 September into early October. Careful sorting required, some unevenness. Very few VT/SGN except Gewurztraminer, picked after rains.
    2005 Drink Heat at flowering, many green harvest to limit yields. Best wines are ripe, balanced. Favorable conditions in October for noble rot, exceptional Gewurztraminer.
    2004 Past peak Riesling in dry style performed best. High yields resulted in many weaker wines. Hardly any VT production.
    2003 Past peak Earliest season since 1893. Record summer temperatures, water stress, hailstorms. Low yields averaged 67 hl/ha. Negligible noble rot, low output of VT, no SGN. Very ripe Pinots, Gewurztraminer. High alcohol & low acidity are common.
    2002 Past peak Varying heat & humidity in summer. Uniform flowering, crop thinning controlled potential volume. Riesling stands out. Favorable end of October for VT/SGN Gewurztraminer.
    2001 Drink/Past peak Indian summer completes ripening. Riesling particularly successful. Very fine year for late-harvest wines across varieties. Rules for ripeness of VT/SGN revised as of 2001 vintage, increasing minimum sugar levels.
    2000 Drink/Past peak Precocious season, ideal spring, hot & dry summer. Ripe, substantial wines with sound acidities. Widespread noble rot, memorable SGN in relatively large quantity (more than 1997, a voluminous year for late-harvest wines).

     

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    Excellent
    Excellent Excellent
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    Exceptional
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    Chart Legend

    These vintage notes have been prepared by Andrew Jefford, Academic Advisor to the Wine Scholar Guild. New vintage information, and any revisions of previous vintage drinking suggestions, are made each autumn.  Use the chart as a guide only; in every vintage there will be outperforming and underperforming wines.

    Learn more about Alsace wines:

     

    Back to French Vintage Chart

     

     

    • Alsace

      Jun 07 - Jun 12, 2020

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      Sep 13 - Sep 18, 2020
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      Oct 04 - Oct 09, 2020
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      Oct 11 - Oct 16, 2020
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      Oct 11 - Oct 16, 2020

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      Oct 18 - Oct 23, 2020

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      Oct 25 - Oct 30, 2020
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    Champagne Vintage Charts & Ratings

    Back to French Vintage Chart

    The vintage chart and harvest reports provided by the Wine Scholar Guild gives you the ranking for every French wine region and vintage from 2000 to today.

    Andrew Jefford, award-winning wine journalist for Decanter Magazine and author of twelve books on wine including The New France has compiled information and written the vintage charts starting with the 2013 vintage. He is also updating information for the vintages prior to 2013.

    Last updated: October 2nd 2019

    Champagne

    Vintage Quality Drink Comments
    2018 Drink/Cellar After the traumas of 2017, 2018 brought smiles back to Champagne, though the season was nonetheless a complicated one. After a wet winter and early spring, April turned very warm and budburst was early. Hail in May and early June followed by mildew was responsible for a minority of growers losing up to 40 per cent of their crop, but in general flowering passed off well, and summer was then the second warmest ever recorded (after 2003), setting up both an early and a generous harvest, one well able to replenish the shortfalls of 2017. Sugar levels were unusually high. The region as a whole recorded an average natural alcohol of over 10%, though some houses asked growers to pick at no more than 9.5%. Anxiety about correspondingly low acidity levels (7-7.5 g/l expressed as tartaric) dissipated when it emerged that it was chiefly malic acid, not tartaric acid, that was lower this year, leaving total acidities unaffected for those houses putting their base wines through malo. The crop has been acclaimed ‘vintage of the century’ (though less than a fifth of the century has elapsed) -- but even cautious insiders found it hard to contain their optimism about a vintage which (for example) suggested to Jean-Baptiste Lécaillon of Louis Roederer a theoretical combination of 1959 and 1947.
    2017 Drink/Cellar Champagne’s 2017 season was a chaotic series of extreme events: the perfect illustration of climate scientists’ global warming predictions. A cold winter was followed by a very warm early spring, leading to dangerously early budburst. Severe frosts in the third week of April then eliminated between 20% and 70% of the potential crop, depending on sub-region (the Côte des Bars was worst affected). After that, the weather was exceptionally hot and sunny up to the end of July, breaking many of the region’s heat records. Storms and hail then caused further losses at the beginning of August, and harvest eventually got underway in late August, though the official date was September 4th (which many, with hindsight, considered too late). It was interrupted by heavy rain, and botrytis outbreaks meant that the grapes had to be carefully sorted. The quality of some Chardonnays was fair to good, but 2017 produced poor quality Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier, and the paucity of grapes means that Champagne houses risk running down their reserves at a time of record sales.
    2016 Drink/Cellar A difficult year for Champagne got underway with a mild winter followed by a cool early spring.  Snow, then frost struck the region on April 27th-28th, followed by two very wet months which caused unprecendented mildew-related losses.  Late July and August, by contrast, were hot enough to cause some problems of sun-burn, with very uneven Chardonnay results in particular.  Overall quantities are down by around 33 per cent, and quality is variable, too, with some softness evident in the balance of Chardonnay-dominated wines.
    2015 Drink/Cellar After a cold, wet winter and very mixed weather in April, it became sunny, warm and dry in May and stayed that way through a largely hot July and mid-August.  The end of August was cooler and wetter, but skies cleared in September and most of the harvest was picked in perfect conditions in the first part of the month. A little rain fell during the picking of the last parcels.  Despite relatively low acid levels (2015 is the lowest acid year since 2003), most feel that the wines of this preponderantly warm, dry year are finely balanced, structured, fresh, concentrated and meant for long ageing.  A vintage year for all -- with some growers claiming that 2015 is the best vintage since 1947.
    2014 Drink/Cellar Spring was mild and warm, leading to a generous fruit set (after two short vintages in 2012 and 2013).  July, by contrast, was cool and wet and this indifferent weather lingered into August finally clearing by the end of the month for a fine, harvest-saving September.  There was an ample crop of irregular wines with very good results for Chardonnay and Montagne de Reims Pinot, but sometimes dilute results in the Marne Valley (which had twice its normal growing-season rainfall).
    2013 Drink/Cellar A long winter and cool spring meant that the Chardonnay didn’t flower until mid-June and the two Pinots in mid-July: a very late date, and potentially disastrous.  There was hail damage in the Marne at the end of July.  Overall, though, July and August were record-breakingly hot and sunny, saving the vintage and meaning that the early September rain was welcome.  Good conditions then resumed for an October harvest of tense and acidic but good quality fruit, ideal for ageing.  A vintage year for most.
    2012 Drink/Cellar Widespread frosts in April touched 131 villages (of 319). Very cold, sunless weather for flowering. Long rainless period from mid-July to September. Total yield: 9,208 kg/ha, lowest volume since 2003, ~40% below 10-year average. Highest average sugars across all varieties. Overall maturity equals 2009. A vintage year is anticipated.
    2011 Drink Hot, dry spring. Exceptionally large harvest, 13,261 kg/ha. Average sugar ripeness & acidities.
    2010 Drink/Cellar Rains mid-August provoked widespread rot reducing crop substantially. High sugars for Chardonnay/Pinot Noir, highest acidities for Pinots in decade of 2000s. Limited vintage declarations.
    2009 Drink Warmest conditions since 2003, optimal maturity, healthy fruit. Balanced wines with average sugars, lower acidities. High overall maturity. Vintage year for some, principally récoltants-manipulants (individual growers). In ’09, new EU rules reduced dosage for Brut to 12 g/l.
    2008 Drink Moderate yields; wines of moderate concentration & acidity. Overall sugar-acid ratio dropped to level of 1990s from higher maturities of 2000s. Declared vintage by many  récoltants-manipulants (individual growers).
    2007 Drink Chardonnay performed best. Summer hail. Lowest fruit maturity of the 2000s. Non-vintage year for many négociants-manipulants (houses), typically declared by récoltants-manipulants (individual growers).
    2006 Drink Cold winter, hot & dry summer. Abundant year, heterogeneous ripening. Above average pH & sugars, average acidity. High overall maturity, in line with ’09 & ’12. Numerous vintage declarations by many producers.
    2005 Drink More difficult season than many French regions in ’05. Successful Chardonnay, weak Pinot Meunier. Good sugar levels, below average acidities.  Vintage declaration by many négociants-manipulants (houses) & récoltants-manipulants (growers).
    2004 Drink Harvest delivered record volume & sound quality. Chardonnay, Meunier were best. Balanced, well-structured Champagnes some compare to ’98.
    2003 Drink/Past peak Atypically hot summer. Earliest harvest since 1822, abnormally low yields of 8,254 kg/ha. Richness & elevated alcohol levels. Numerous vintage declarations. Some examples are missing sufficient backbone.
    2002 Drink/Cellar Both Chardonnay & Pinot Noir ripened well. Balanced Champagnes, a declared vintage by producers of all types. Superb prestige Champagnes, many will benefit from further cellaring.
    2001 Past peak Cold, wet September. Lacked maturity: low sugars & elevated acidity. Not a vintage year except for some récoltants-manipulants (individual growers).
    2000 Drink Difficult summer marked by rain, widespread hail. Favorable September weather for harvest. Widely declared “millennium” vintage… some fine examples, 0thers are soft, lack intensity & should be drunk (now).

     

     

    Quality Poor Poor
    to
    Fair
    Fair Fair
    to
    Good
    Good Good
    to
    Excellent
    Excellent Excellent
    to
    Exceptional
    Exceptional
    Chart Legend

    These vintage notes have been prepared by Andrew Jefford, Academic Advisor to the Wine Scholar Guild. New vintage information, and any revisions of previous vintage drinking suggestions, are made each autumn.  Use the chart as a guide only; in every vintage there will be outperforming and underperforming wines.

    LEARN MORE ABOUT CHAMPAGNE WINES:

    Back to French Vintage Chart

    • Alsace

      Jun 07 - Jun 12, 2020

      SOLD-OUT

    • Champagne

      Jun 23 - Jun 27, 2020

      SOLD-OUT

    • Piedmont

      Sep 13 - Sep 18, 2020
    • Bordeaux

      Oct 04 - Oct 09, 2020
    • Loire

      Oct 11 - Oct 16, 2020
    • Sicily

      Oct 11 - Oct 16, 2020

      SOLD-OUT

    • Rhône

      Oct 18 - Oct 23, 2020

      SOLD-OUT

    • Bourgogne

      Oct 25 - Oct 30, 2020
    • Languedoc-Roussillon

      Oct 25 - Oct 30, 2020

      SOLD-OUT

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